lettersandlight:

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Are you tackling a writing project that isn’t a brand-spanking new novel during Camp NaNoWriMo? Good news! We’re compiling lists of everything we know about nonfiction, editing, and scripts. We revisit editing while it’s fresh in our minds from the “Now What?” Months…

Panel has begun!

jennyatsdcc:

Bryan begins by talking about the change, the show is NOT cancelled. It is moving over to digital because of numbers- while on the air it got relatively low ratings, digital streaming was through the roof. Though the transition and announcement could have been done better, it will still be available, and it will start going online NEXT FRIDAY AUGUST 1ST WITH A NEW EPISODE EVERY WEEK, WITH A TWO PART SEASON 3 FINALE ON AUGUST 22.

madystacy:

Panel sing-along to “Secret Tunnel!!!”

Shit almost made me cry!

mako-of-steel:

Mako raging over Korra’s kidnapping, it is tomorrow.

And Makorra shall rise.

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feministcaptainkirk:

hoodfuturism:

Marvel Fancast: Nona Gaye as Ororo Munroe/Storm

PLEASE

HELL YES

notquitephil:

newageamazon:

legolokiismighty:

THERE NEEDS TO BE A GILES

GILES AND GILES-AS-RIPPER “BAND CANDY” VARIANT.

If I age half as well as Anthony Stewart Head I’ll die, well… handsome.

salahmah:

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.

The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).

Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 

"The United States has not produced as many world-class Quidditch teams as other nations because the game has had to compete with the American broom game of Quodpot…There are eleven players a side in the game of Quodpot. They throw the Quod, or modified Quaffle, from team member to member, attempting to get it into the ‘pot’ at the end of the pitch before it explodes. Any player in possession of the Quod when it explodes must leave the pitch. Once the Quod is safely in the ‘pot’ (a small cauldron containing a solution which will proven the Quod from exploding), the scorer’s team is awarded a point and a new Quod is brought on to the pith. Quodpot has had some success as a minority sport in Europe, though the vast majority of wizards remain faithful to Quidditch” — Quidditch Through the Ages by Kennilworthy Whisp

Introverts

featherended:

aspieartistjourdan:

Being a introvert is like being Robert Downey Jr. in your head

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and Castiel in real life

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how did you manage to sum it up so easily


Headcanon: most of the muggleborns don’t know that laptops and cellphones don’t work at hogwarts so they bring them anyways and then have to explain how they function to the pure- and half-bloods. Eventually this leads to someone setting up a WiFi point in Hogsmeade and the boathouse.

Headcanon: most of the muggleborns don’t know that laptops and cellphones don’t work at hogwarts so they bring them anyways and then have to explain how they function to the pure- and half-bloods. Eventually this leads to someone setting up a WiFi point in Hogsmeade and the boathouse.

boazpriestly:

  • Over-explanation. This includes prologues. “Prologues are never needed. You can usually throw them in the garbage. They’re usually put on as a patch.”
  • Too much data. “You’re trying to seduce your reader, not burden them,” Friedman said.
  • Over-writing, or “trying too hard.” “We think the more description we add, the more vivid it will be; but we don’t want to be distracted from the story” we open the book for.
  • Beginning the novel with an interior monologue or reflection. Usually this is written as the thoughts of a character who is sitting alone, musing and thinking back on a story. Just start with the story.
  • Beginning the novel with a flashback. Friedman isn’t entirely anti-flashback, but the novel’s opening page is the wrong place for one.
  • Beginning a novel with the “waking up sequence” of a character waking, getting out of bed, putting on slippers, heading for the kitchen and coffee…a cliche
  • Related cliche: beginning the novel with an alarm clock or a ringing phone
  • Starting out with an “ordinary day’s routine” for the main character
  • Beginning with “crisis moments” that aren’t unique: “When the doctor said ‘malignant,’ my life changed forever…” or “The day my father left us I was seven years old…”
  • Don’t start with a dialogue that doesn’t have any context. Building characterization through dialogue is okay anywhere else but there.
  • Starting with backstory, or “going back, then going forward.”
  • Info dump. More formally called “exposition.”
  • Character dump, which is four or more characters on the first page.

Seeing news from people at SDCC

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